Commas and Ampersands

142,581 notes

lmvgn:

youngblackandvegan:

callmekitto:

cuddlyferre:

dancing-mylife-away:

literally the best ice skating i have ever seen in my entire life

at the end i was literally applauding from my bed

ok so i saw the thumbnail and the comment and i thought “hahaha it would be so funny if he was doing irish dance on ice it looks like he’s doing a double knee there”

I’M SO DONE IT TOOK ONE NOTE OF THE MUSIC AND I’M SO DONE I CAN NOW RECOGNIZE RIVERDANCE WITHOUT ANY ACTUAL SIGNS OF RIVERDANCE

I love listening to the commentators

because at the beginning you can hear them being a bit reserved and all professional but they get giddier and giddier as his performance goes on, they’re just happy to watch this wonderful skater and just. oh my heart

it’s all aflutter 

someone give this man all the awards

almost cried at the end omg

(via faithfandomfitnessfun)

84,180 notes

whatrachelreads:

aprilsvigil:

No. You know what? Fuck this.

If Ron and Hermione weren’t going to be a thing, you know who she should have ended up with? Not Harry, that’s for fucking sure.

Viktor Krum.

The only motherfucker worthy of the ground that goddess walks on

ok that’s my opinion, bye

He saw her when she was FOURTEEN and BUSHY HAIRED in the LIBRARY and was like, “I gotta get me some of that.” 

Viktor Krum: the underrated romantic lead.

Filed under harry potter hermione granger viktor krum

15,604 notes

It’s a conversation any books-first Harry Potter fan is all too familiar with: You’re talking about how wonderful Harry Potter is (because just because it’s nearly 2014 doesn’t mean you’re stopping that conversation any time soon), and your friend brings up that it doesn’t make any sense Harry wound up with Ginny Weasley of all people, because Ginny is the worst.

I’m sorry. This isn’t true at all! That’s just what Warner Brothers inexplicably wanted you to think because of the fact Ginny was in roughly 20 minutes of the entire franchise (time spent nearly dying in the Chamber of Secrets when she was 11 not included). Ginny is a really cool girl who becomes a really cool lady and –bonus! — through her J.K. Rowling taught teenage readers a lot of really valuable lessons about being yourself, owning your own accomplishments, and not waiting around for guys (well, at least not too much).

But while Book Ginny was a dynamic, feisty character, Film Ginny is a Manic Pixie Wallflower that could be literally anyone Daniel Radcliffe had zero chemistry with. Seriously, was it not possible for her to accio a personality from anyone in the general vicinity? Her entire role in the movies was to awkwardly kiss Harry once at the Burrow and once at Hogwarts, and then stare at him while he ran around actually doing things during the final battles.

There are plenty of Harry Potter book-to-film changes I’m still not over. (Who are the Marauders, you ask? Don’t ask anyone who only watched the movies!) But recently, what’s bugging me more and more is how little respect Ginny gets — and I think a lot of it is because of the films. It’s time someone stood up and defended her; She’s actually a really cool character — it’s just that none of her awesomeness translated onscreen.

Book Ginny would never. Let’s take a trip down memory lane…

Number One: Ginny from the book didn’t wait around for any man. When the boy of her dreams appeared disinterested (he had a few other things on his mind!) she didn’t get desperate. Instead, she got friendly with Dean, showing The Chosen One she had plenty of other things going on in her life. Next!

Number Two: While Harry is crushing on Cho in Order of the Phoenix, Ginny didn’t let her crush stand in the way of being useful and smart. She gave him support for Dumbledore’s Army, and helped fight at the Department of Mysteries, among other battles.

Number Three: While Harry, Ron and Hermione were off roaming a forest, Ginny was actually braving things out at Hogwarts — and it wasn’t all Yule Balls and Quidditch. In the books, Ginny and Neville are shown to be keeping the rebellion going at school (“Dumbledore’s Army, still recruiting“) – but only Neville’s heroism made the film. Ginny got to be a movie girlfriend, instead. -100 Points from the House of Movie Studios.

Number Four: This isn’t badass, per se, but I always thought it was really cool that right before Harry and Ginny finally kissed, Ginny was off winning a Quidditch game because her dumb crush was stuck in detention. Guys, am I right?

Entertainment Weekly's Erin Strecker on why Book Ginny is cooler than Movie Ginny (via courtneysmovieblog)

(via yahighway)

221,809 notes

maeglinhiei:

literallyrad:

today there was a snowboard race at the resort i’m staying at and i’m a pretty decent snowboarder so i thought why not try right. so i wear all black just because it’s the only color i own and i ended up winning and when the announcer came over to me he said “dude! that was pretty awesome bro, what’s your name?” and i took my helmet off like in the movies and let my hair fall out and was like “caitlin” and everyone was liKE OOOOOOH

(via faithfandomfitnessfun)

30,192 notes

People don’t like her because it’s the making of her, right now. When she, sometime soon in the future, becomes this person that she’s been kind of building up to, for the past three seasons, now four, then people will really begin to root for her. I think even the audience doesn’t realize she’s such a dark horse. If she acted badass and tried to kill everyone there, she would be dead by now! She’s so intelligent, and I can’t stress that enough. Courtesy is a lady’s armor. She’s using her courtesy to deceive people, and she’s using her former self as a facade, and it works so much to her advantage, because people still think she’s this naive, vulnerable, little girl, and she’s really not. She knows exactly what she’s doing. She knows what game she’s playing! And no one else does. And she’s learned from the best — Cersei, Margaery, Tyrion, Littlefinger, even Joffrey. She’s learned so much from these people, and they don’t even realize it. They’re unwittingly feeding her to become this great kind of manipulator. King’s Landing can either make or break a person, and in Sansa’s case, it’s making her.
Sophie Turner, in response to Sansa hate (x)

(Source: beyonslays)

Filed under sophie turner sansa stark game of thrones

130,423 notes

euclase2:

kiokushitaka:

curiousercreature:

letsallnukethewhales:

madlori:

nevver:

The alphabet fades away

Would you like to read a book in which this happens?
It’s one of my all-time favorite books.  It’s called Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn.  He describes it as an “progressively lipogrammatic epistolary fable.”
It is written in the form of letters between the citizens of the fictional island of Nollop, an independent nation off the coast of South Carolina and home of Nevin Nollop, who invented the phrase “the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.”  That phrase is written in tiles over a statue of Nollop in their town square, and when one night a storm causes one of the tiles to fall, the council decides that it’s a sign from Nollop that they are no longer allowed to use that letter, in speech or writing, on pain of progressive punishments including public beating and up to banishment.
Then another tile falls.  Then another.
The citizens, who are all very attached to their words and writing, mount a campaign to come up with a phrase that uses all 26 letters but is shorter than Nollop’s, thus proving that he was not divine and negating all the edicts.
Because the novel is told in the form of letters the citizens write, and this is the genius part…the author must also stop using the letters as they fall.  So the book gradually stops using letters until at one point I think they’re down to just five.
The resolution literally made me get up and dance around the room.
It’s clever, creative, and a not-really-veiled-at-all parable about monotheistic oligarchy.  It’s not a long book, you can read it in an afternoon.
GO READ IT RIGHT NOW.

WOW I want to read that book

Very rarely is there a book that I must read at any costThis is now one of them

my coworker was JUST telling me about this book…

There’s another book like this called Alphabetical Africa. In each chapter, the words begin with progressively more letters. So in the first chapter, every word begins with A, and in the second chapter, the words begin with A and B, and in the third, A, B, and C, and so on. 
By the middle chapter, the author uses all 26 letters. But then it goes back again, so that by the end of the book, the words only begin with A.
It’s like reading someone learn a new language, and their words are very limited at first, and it’s frustrating as they try to tell this story using only A words. By the middle of the book, the story is rich and alive and excitedly full of language. But then the latter half of the book is sad, because they’re slowly forgetting all the words again, and they end up where they started.
I wish I could remember the author.

euclase2:

kiokushitaka:

curiousercreature:

letsallnukethewhales:

madlori:

nevver:

The alphabet fades away

Would you like to read a book in which this happens?

It’s one of my all-time favorite books.  It’s called Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn.  He describes it as an “progressively lipogrammatic epistolary fable.”

It is written in the form of letters between the citizens of the fictional island of Nollop, an independent nation off the coast of South Carolina and home of Nevin Nollop, who invented the phrase “the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.”  That phrase is written in tiles over a statue of Nollop in their town square, and when one night a storm causes one of the tiles to fall, the council decides that it’s a sign from Nollop that they are no longer allowed to use that letter, in speech or writing, on pain of progressive punishments including public beating and up to banishment.

Then another tile falls.  Then another.

The citizens, who are all very attached to their words and writing, mount a campaign to come up with a phrase that uses all 26 letters but is shorter than Nollop’s, thus proving that he was not divine and negating all the edicts.

Because the novel is told in the form of letters the citizens write, and this is the genius part…the author must also stop using the letters as they fall.  So the book gradually stops using letters until at one point I think they’re down to just five.

The resolution literally made me get up and dance around the room.

It’s clever, creative, and a not-really-veiled-at-all parable about monotheistic oligarchy.  It’s not a long book, you can read it in an afternoon.

GO READ IT RIGHT NOW.

WOW I want to read that book

Very rarely is there a book that I must read at any cost
This is now one of them

my coworker was JUST telling me about this book…

There’s another book like this called Alphabetical Africa. In each chapter, the words begin with progressively more letters. So in the first chapter, every word begins with A, and in the second chapter, the words begin with A and B, and in the third, A, B, and C, and so on. 

By the middle chapter, the author uses all 26 letters. But then it goes back again, so that by the end of the book, the words only begin with A.

It’s like reading someone learn a new language, and their words are very limited at first, and it’s frustrating as they try to tell this story using only A words. By the middle of the book, the story is rich and alive and excitedly full of language. But then the latter half of the book is sad, because they’re slowly forgetting all the words again, and they end up where they started.

I wish I could remember the author.

(via faithfandomfitnessfun)